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Tanka Part One: Native Representations

In Prose by nativesinamerica

By Taylor Schad It’s mid-March, I’m in the cab of my family’s Ford pickup, my mom is driving and my older sister sits shotgun, across from me is my little sister or Tanka as we say in our Native language. She’s not so little anymore – at 6’2” she towers over the rest of our family, myself included. I’ve been …

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#NativeVoters

In Prose by nativesinamerica

By Kirsten Shaw I had the chance to stand behind Bernie Sanders with my mom and I felt so lucky. I had seen him speak in San Jose but wasn’t as focused as I was today. Standing behind Bernie literally and figuratively was so empowering. To be the next generation of voters was something that gets me excited. I’ve never got this …

Respect

In Prose by nativesinamerica

By Julia Wakeford “If you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all.” We’ve all heard the phrase before, its often used to teach our children not to insult others, to keep their negative thoughts on the inside. Political Correctness functions in a similar way. It simply puts a pretty face on bigotry and stereotypes. As a …

The Contemporary Cherokee

In Prose by nativesinamerica

By Tennessee Loy What is a contemporary Cherokee? The answer the age-old question of what exactly Native American identity is. No one person knows what Native American Identity is, I am just Cherokee. I have the Cherokee experience, you will get no argument from me that we Cherokee are the most overly claimed tribal identity. The 2000 federal census states …

Being Choctaw In This Moment

In Prose by nativesinamerica

By Bridgette Annalyse Jameson Perhaps the title should be “Being Indigenous in this Moment” because surely my brothers and sisters from other tribes, nations, and countries can relate. There is a multitude of emotions being felt because of this case; a multitude of wounds being opened, triggered by different bits and pieces of the story at hand. Lexi, (also known as …

A’o’tsévôhomó’hestôtse (Victory Dance!)

In Prose by nativesinamerica

By Kaden Walksnice Ancestral Cheyenne Homelands at Naahéo’hé’e(Otter Creek) are closer to being protected by coal development. Arch Coal is one of the World’s top largest coal producers for the global power generation industries and we have stopped them from mining on Cheyenne lands! On March 10th Arch Coal released a statement announced the suspension of the Proposed Otter Creek …

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How Do We Define American Nationalism Today?

In Prose by Celeste Kimimila Terry

How do we define an American today, are we relying upon a civic or ethnic definition of nationalism? Which do you believe should be the determining factor for an American? Why? “American” without the hyphen connotes “white” whilst all others are hyphenated people of color, this assumption of ethnic nationalism is very alive and well today. It is a protected …

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Further Response to the Desecration of Sumeg Village

In Prose by nativesinamerica

By Sinéad Talley A response to a piece originally posted here  I’d like to preface this letter by saying that we do not need another piece attacking or degrading those who display ignorance and a lack of respect for Native cultures. Even more importantly, we do not need another piece that promotes negative perceptions of Native peoples. That’s been done. As …

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Writing Activism: A Conversation With Danielle Miller

In Prose by nativesinamerica

By: Talon Bazille Ducheneaux With the rise in social media, activism has found its way to being more easily read and heard worldwide. In this regard, Indigenous-based activism and cross-cultural representation has made its way to this higher form of representation, one of the translating mediums being in the realm of writing. One of the people making serious headway through …

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It’s Time

In Prose by Doris Brown

I am a student at Norwich University which is a  small, very small, college in Vermont. The demographic here is not the best, but it’s manageable. I have seen/met only four Natives. It’s sad, to be honest, because I walk around getting the same question– “What are you?”; and when I answer, I get the same response– “No way, you …